Search results for category: Refugees/Displacement/Migrants

Malaysia: Indigenous groups contest mega-dams in Sarawak 

Sarawak — a forested Malaysian state on the island of Borneo — is home to 2.5 million people and 40 indigenous groups. The rights of many of these groups are now under threat as three of China’s state-owned companies are helping to build as many as 51 controversial dams in Sarawak. These projects will displace large numbers of indigenous communities who lack the legal...

Burma: International support needed to protect Rohingyas from persecution 

Statement, 14 June 2012 Odhikar is deeply alarmed by rapidly deteriorating sectarian violence in the Rakhine State of western Burma since June 3, 2012. So far the facts and evidence received by Odhikar depicts a grim scenario in which the minority Rohingyas are particularly persecuted and forced to leave their homeland. They are being killed, wounded and their villages burnt and when they try...

Burma: Dams feed ethnic conflict  

‘The soldiers came to my house and said, “Starting now you cannot grow on the farms near the river,” and I asked him back: “Why?” He gave the reason that they will build the dam in that area. They confiscated the land from my farm, it was about 18 acres.’  Molo villager facing eviction. On 30 September 2011, President Thein Sein announced an indefinite...

Uzbekistan/Kazakhstan: Retreating Aral Sea displaces Karakalpaks 

The shrinking of the Aral Sea by 90 per cent and desertification of most of its territory is one of the most visible environmental disasters in the world over the last fifty years. While improved water management has led to modest growth in the volume of Kazakhstan’s northern portion of the sea in recent years, there is little prospect of similar changes in the...

India: Adivasis fight mega-dams  

A new “powerhouse” is emerging in the frontier state of Arunachal Pradesh, north-eastern India. Public and private companies have proposed 168 massive dams, to produce 57,000 megawatts of hydropower, in this strategically important region, which borders Myanmar in the east, Bhutan in the west and China in the north. All of these dams are proposed for the upper reaches of the Brahmaputra...

Ethiopia: Forced displacement and ‘villagization' 

The Ethiopian government has forcibly relocated 70,000 indigenous people from the fertile Gambella region to free up land for commercial agriculture. Local activist Ojulu talked to Corinne Lennox about some of the effects of this so-called ‘villagization’ policy.One year after the villagization programme even those farmers who tried to do farming in the new places were not able to produce enough for the whole...

Uganda: Land injustice for the Basongora 

The Basongora are a pastoralist community that lived and occupied land in Kasese district, north of the Maramagambo forest in western Uganda. The Basongora rely on cattle-herding for their livelihoods. Under colonial rule, Basongora lost 90 per cent of their land between 1900 and 1955 to establish the Queen Elizabeth National Park. The Basongora were evicted, their animals destroyed and huts torched, and no...

Thailand: Indigenous people penalised for carrying out traditional practices 

For decades, indigenous peoples have been forcibly evicted and relocated from their lands on grounds of national security, development and resource conservation. In the north, smaller mountain-dwelling ethnic groups, including Akha, Hmong, Karen, Lahu, Lisu and Mein, struggle to survive economically and culturally in the face of development projects, land-ownership issues and the influx of ethnic Thais. In July, officials at Kaeng Krachan National...

Film: State of the World's Minorities and Indigenous Peoples 2012 

Natural resource development projects such as logging and dams, oil and mineral extraction and large-scale agriculture have been successful in generating vast revenues across the globe. But at what cost to minorities and indigenous peoples?In its flagship annual publication, State of the World's Minorities and Indigenous Peoples 2012, Minority Rights Group International documents hundreds of case studies about marginalized groups who have been adversely...

China: Hard times for nomads in Tibet 

Across the grasslands of northern China, ethnic minority nomads are being systematically relocated into settled communities as part of a process known as "ecological migration." The government's ostensible goal is to restore degraded grasslands, but many believe this is a convenient way for the state to assert greater control over minority people and their territories, and to facilitate natural resource exploitation. Since the mid...

Colombia: San Juan community assert their rights  

In 2010, the Supreme Community Council of Alto San Juan ASOCASAN in Chocó, Colombia drew up their own community protocol, to assert their rights to govern their territories and natural resources according to their customary, national, and international rights and responsibilities. The community protocol provides an overview of the Alto San Juan’s history, and highlights their long standing relationship with their land and the...

State of the World's Minorities and Indigenous Peoples 2012 

Natural resource development projects such as logging and dams, oil and mineral extraction and large-scale agriculture have been successful in generating vast revenues across the globe. But at what cost to minorities and indigenous peoples?In its flagship annual publication, State of the World's Minorities and Indigenous Peoples 2012, Minority Rights Group International documents hundreds of case studies about marginalized groups who have been adversely...

Papua New Guinea: Police raids around Porgera gold mine 

The Porgera gold mine is located in the highlands of Papua New Guinea. It is one the largest in the country and has operated since 2006 as part of the Porgera Joint Venture (PJV).PJV is 95 per cent owned by subsidiaries of the Canadian Barrick Gold Corporation (Barrick), the largest gold mining company in the world; the provincial government owns 2.5 per cent, and...

Turkey: Dam deluge for Kurds 

The proposed 12,000 megawatt Ilisu dam on the Tigris River in south-east Turkey is one of the world’s most controversial hydro projects. Up to 78,000 people, mainly Kurds, but also other minorities including Arameans and Arabs will be directly affected by this project. Thousands more people will be affected in the downstream neighbouring countries of Syria and Iraq. Moreover, the 313 square-kilometre reservoir will...

Botswana: Diamonds bring no benefits to Basarwa  

While Botswana’s government has never officially admitted to forcibly relocating the G/wi and G//ana communities of the Basarwa indigenous group to make way for diamond-mining operations in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve (CKGR), critics have long suspected this to be the main motivation for the removals. When it became known in late 2010 that Gem Diamonds would begin mining operations in the CKGR, suspicions...

Europe: Corporate abuse flows along BP’s oil pipeline  

Early in 2011, the UK government ruled that a BP-led oil consortium was not carrying out the human rights responsibilities of multinational companies in its operations on the controversial Baku–Tbilisi–Ceyhan (BTC) oil pipeline. The 1,770 km pipeline runs from offshore oil fields in the Caspian Sea near Azerbaijan’s capital Baku, to Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, and on to the port of Ceyhan on...

Italy: San Sperate (un)welcomes Roma 

Following their eviction from the encampment on the 554 route, 26 Roma have been moved to the small town of San Sperate, about 15 km away from Sardinia’s main city, Cagliari.On 3 July 2012 a heated public debate took place in San Sperate, where the mayor expressed his concern that “the town is unable to deal with the situation which has been created”, because...

Democratic Republic of Congo: Indigenous organizations call for humanitarian assistance for displaced Batwa people  

We, organizations of indigenous Batwa people and those who accompany them, regret to note the following:- Large-scale displacement of indigenous Batwa across the entire province of North Kivu due to numerous conflicts that occur. Therefore, they are the primary innocent victims;- Indigenous Batwa people do not have access to, or have difficulty accessing, emergency humanitarian aid in IDP (internally displaced persons) camps due to...

Egypt: forceful relocation of Christians from Rafah, Sinai 

Al Kalema Center for human rights (ACHR) condemns in the strongest terms the recent forced relocation of Christian Coptic residents of Rafah, located in Sinai Peninsula. ACHR considers the Egyptian government to bear some responsibility for this situation by advising Christians to move rather than providing them with adequate protection so that they can stay in their homes. If the Egyptian government is to...

Sri Lanka: Who will listen to our silent cry from the wilderness? 

The Sri Lankan Government has announced to the whole world that it has closed down the last detention camp that was existing from the end of the civil war in 2009, at Manic Farm in Vavuniya.It is trying to give a picture that the detainees are re-settled successfully and the war victims are rehabilitated properly. But the real story of the re-settlement is just...


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